Tuesday, June 1, 2010

From Birkins to Burqas, SATC2 Sucked

Last week as I was sitting in the doctor's office waiting to be called, a woman and her husband sat directly across from me. Normally, I wouldn't have even looked up from my BlackBerry, but this woman was wearing a burqa.

I noticed.

I tried not to stare, but there's something fascinating and a little eerie about seeing only a woman's eyes. And it's not something you run into often in Cleveland, Ohio. I found myself sneaking little peeks at her, wondering what she was wearing beneath her black robes, wondering if her whole face was as gorgeous as her eyes, wondering if she was thin or heavy or maybe even hiding a baby bump.

The wait was long and the waiting room was restless. We made eye contact and shared a quick eye roll about another patient yammering on her cell phone. I smiled. It was nice to make a connection. Soon after, we both disappeared into exam rooms and I didn't think of her again.

Until Friday night when we decided to have a girls' night out to see Sex And the City 2. As you guys know we were excited to go see a fun, silly movie. And it was fun.

We had a great dinner beforehand and the movie started off ridiculous, but entertaining. Let's just say you don't walk into Sex And the City and expect an oscar worthy film. And I'm not a movie snob. I can sit through (and enjoy) just about any movie including Bride Wars. What can I say? It's a gift.

We had some laughs at the girls' expense throughout the film. The dialogue was forced, the outfits were ridiculous and their lives were completely unrealistic, but it was still fun. And then they went to Abu Dhabi and that's where things started to get uncomfortable.

The scene where the ladies observe a woman wearing a burqa at a restaurant and wait with bated breath for her to eat a french fry kind of worked. Their curiosity reminded me of myself in that waiting room. How would she eat the french fries? Was there a mouth hole in the burqa? The woman delicately lifted the burqa and put a single french fry in her mouth and Carrie quipped about her dedication to fried food. It was interesting to watch American characters deal with a tradition so outside our social norms. Especially characters who were created to embody sexual freedom and empowerment for women. I'll never forget that scene.

But things went downhill from there. The women took Abu Dhabi by storm, completely ignoring and at times, ridiculing, the culture of the country where they were guests. Samantha's racy encounter with a man at dinner would have been offensive just about anywhere, but in a Muslim country it was grounds for arrest. By the time we reached the climax of the movie (no pun intended) Samantha had almost been stoned to death in an outdoor market and the women were all running around in burqas like they were middle eastern clown costumes.

The tone was all wrong. Characters that I'd grown to love after six television seasons were ridiculing Muslim women and their beliefs. And no matter how repressive we find the burqa in America, it made me angry to watch American characters go to a foreign country and completely disrespect their culture.

I think a commenter at IFC.com said it better than I'll ever be able to:

"[SATC 2] is an accidental candid snapshot of the sick, dying heart of America, a film so pleased with its vacuous, trashy, art-free extravagance that its poster should be taped to the dingy walls of terrorist sleeper agents worldwide. More depressing and alarming than the movies themselves is the notion that a certain culture, a certain mindset, birthed it, without a pang of remorse or even apparent self-awareness, much less self-criticism. Ladies and gentlemen, this is why they hate us."

On my way home from the movie I couldn't stop thinking about the woman I'd seen in the doctor's office earlier in the week. Somehow the movie made me feel like I'd just paid $10 for the cinematic equivalent of spitting in her face.

So tell us, those of you who have seen the movie, are we taking it too seriously?

60 comments:

Amie McCracken said...

I have not seen it and won't. Not that I'm vehemently against it, but I don't want to live up to what that commentator said. I refuse to be the stupid American. (Especially since I'm living as an expat right now.) It makes me sad to hear that the movie was thoughtless. I don't mind SATC, it's just not me. But now I'm frustrated that this is what the world will see of us. Seriously, is that something we want put in the museums in 100 years?

Christine Danek said...

I have not seen it. I never watched the show and the movie didn't interest me. I really am hurt that they were so thoughtless. Seriously. I understand art and freedom of expression--pushing the envelope but was that scene really necessary? or was it for ratings? I travel a good deal and my husband travels the world constantly --to places such as this. Both of us see how other countries can perceive us and I understand why. I think a little respect goes a long way. I don't think you are over reacting.

Creepy Query Girl said...

woah. I never would have thought a 'sex in the city' film could spark such controversy. I haven't seen it yet and it probably won't come out in france for a while. I had no idea about the muslim elements in the film until I read it here. It's a touchy subject in france. They are passing a law here to forbid the burqa with the argument that it is not an expression of religion but an expression of a culture in which women are repressed, controlled, and forced to hide their whole bodies beneath clothes and their view pionts behind closed mouths. This makes me ponder if the french reaction to the film will be any different than the american. Hmn.

Matthew Rush said...

Haven't seen it but somehow that doesn't surprise me much. It is that kind of insensitive ethnocentrism that is so rife in our culture that makes so much of the world despise America.

If you think it's bad in Cleveland come check out the south. Thanks for sharing though ladies, it's a little sobering to see you post something serious, but certainly not unwelcome.

salarsenッ said...

I have not seen the movie and won't. In the past--way past--I'd watched the show. Loved the tirades and freedom those characters were allowed that I, as a mother, was not--or would never allow myself. Yeah, living vicariously. But I recognized some of the points you just made a while back within the show. Sure, some topics were funny but where do you draw the line. I chose to stop watching.

There is a fine line around every border of culture and ethnic backgrounds that must be respected.

Dianne K. Salerni said...

I haven't seen it. I used to enjoy the show in its earlier seasons, but I got really tired of the self-centered characters. In the earlier seasons, I related to their struggles to find love and self-respect ... but somewhere along the way I lost all sympathy for them.

The movie as you describe it sounds appalling. It's embarrassing to have such big name stars lend credence to the idea that Americans have no respect for the other cultures of the world.

Loretta Nyhan said...

This is a really thoughtful, well-written review, gals.

Ugh. Just ugh. SATC 2 is so obviously manipulation for the sake of making a buck. I loved the TV show, but it had its time and place, and that time is most definitely over.

And, I'm disappointed in SJP. Didn't she read the script? Maybe she just wanted to pay for an addition to her house in the Hamptons.

Vicki Rocho said...

I haven't seen it. I JUST saw the first one a week ago and it didn't do anything for me...I'm no movie snob either.

I've never seen a full episode of the TV show, and I think because the movie was intended for those who already knew and loved the characters.

From the trailers, this second movie seemed like a bad idea gone way wrong. I'm kind of surprised with all that's going on in the world, and as hypersensitive as some people are to this obsessive need for political correctness that something like this would slip through the cracks.

Jen said...

I should have only watched the first movie, (and the six seasons of course). I knew it wasn't going to be great but I hadn't expected it to be that far off. I'm glad you posted this because I wasn't sure if I was feeling the right emotions, but I'm with you.

The story line was choppy and unrealistic, they focused more time on the wrong stuff (beating down a culture) and no time on the good stuff, BIG and Carrie, Aidan and Carrie, the rest of the gang. I mean we see Stanford during the first 15 minutes and then nothing else, what about their relationships? I wanted more of THEM... not Abu Dhabi. I was not a fan and no amount of cosmo's was going to take that away.

Very disappointed, I had hoped for something much better.

Cheree said...

I haven't seen it and don't plan on it. SATC has never really interested me, but from the adds it makes it look like silly airheads, I would have had no idea of the controversy surrounding it.

This is the reason why there's a lot of hate floating around out there. The majority cannot accept difference, instead they have to mock it.

The Hot Heads Groupie said...

I've got plans to see it this weekend w/a group of friends. We're making a night of it too. This disappoints me. Like you, I expected it to be mindless fun. I don't feel comfortable with what you've described though. I had heard that it wasn't as good as the series or the first movie, but there is a difference between a mediocre movie offset by some great fashion and a few snippets of witty dialog and something that's downright offensive. :(

Kristi Helvig said...

I've never seen the show but had plans to see SATC2 Friday night for a girls' night out. We got there to find the movie was sold out so we had dinner and went to a cool wine bar instead. I'm thinking we didn't miss much, so thanks so much for posting this. :)

Christina Lee said...

wow. I decined seeing it last night with friends--texting friends now to ask what they thought!

Sharon K. Mayhew said...

I'm so sad to see your review. I was (WAS) looking forward to seeing the movie, but now not so much. I don't like the idea of the girls making fun of a culture. I'm very disappointed...

Jill Wheeler said...

Why did they make them go on a trip again??? Agh, the movie sucked from beginning to end. And it made me hate Aidan. Bastards. The only good scene was between Miranda and Charlotte, talking about their kids. That scene made me cry a little. On the inside. That scene was old school SATC.

Bethany Elizabeth said...

No, I haven't seen the movie. I don't even know if it'll be released in theaters in France - hopefully not, because there's a large Muslim population here, and I wouldn't want to grouped together with a movie that offends their beliefs as 'that American, like that movie.'
I'm very encouraged by your review though, because even though a movie can be callous, that doesn't mean people will like it without thinking about it. You're so amazing to post an honest review like this, and even though I don't want to see the movie now (I never did, though. I'm more of a Disney person) I'm grateful for such an open-minded review. I know I personally can sometimes just watch something without even thinking about it until someone says, 'That's really offensive,' but you two noticed. So... that's another reason why I think you're awesome!

Courtney Barr - The Southern Princess said...

I don't plan on seeing it and well am not completely surprised.

I hate that they did a segment that made you feel the way you did. In many ways they not only committed a disservice to Muslim women but to the intelligence and heart of Americans.

Sad.

Visit My Kingdom Anytime

Little Ms J said...

I felt like a good friend had died when I walked out of the movie. Aside from alienating the fans that had watched them for years (I felt like I was watching their move into the Golden Girls), it made Americans look brash and disgusting. I was embarrassed for the characters and for our culture.

Stina Lindenblatt said...

When I was in university, I did a work exchange in Finland. During the pre-trip meeting with students going to other countries, we were told to wear a Canadian flag on our backpacks so we wouldn't be confused for American. Now you know why.

I love the series, but thought the first movie was only okay. I'll definitely be skipping on the second one. Thanks for the warning.

Janet Johnson said...

I'm not a Sex and the City watcher, and what I just read would certainly prevent me from ever trying to watch. Have to agree with IFC.com. It's why they hate us.

A little respect can go a long way. I walk my son to school with many women in burqas walking their children. They are polite, respectful women who are living their religion. We should respect that.

Tricia J. O'Brien said...

Haven't seen it. Won't after reading this. I dislike comedy based on trashing someone else's culture.
I once saw a woman in a burqa in the LA airport. I snuck glances like you did. It's hard as an American woman to understand, to watch a woman completely covered, trailing behind her husband and son. But I have another story that hit me hard. My daughter went surfing in Morocco. She wore board shorts and tried to be respectful but still was uncomfortable when she got out of the water to find a group of women in burqas watching. She decided to smile at them, and to her surprise, they burst into applause and congratulated her on catching a big wave. So. Who is within those yards of fabric?

ChristaCarol said...

Oh man, how awful. Sounds very shallow. In the past, I've enjoyed SATC, even saw the first movie. Wasn't awesome or anything. I'm disappointed already and I haven't even seen the second one. Won't int he theaters for sure, but will spend a dollar at redbox just out of curiosity of how they disrespect a culture.

Carolyn V. said...

I haven't seen it and probably won't. It's really sad that they had to put that into the storyline.

Katie said...

Wow. you are so right. What happened? Fantastic post, guys!

Lou said...

My (very socially conscious) friend and I just made plans to see this on Saturday. I've heard the bad reviews, but to hear it from someone who's not a critic... that scares me. I'm rethinking this plan.

PJ Hoover said...

Whoa, what a fantastic post! I love how you had the experience and then saw the movie. Thank you so much for sharing!

Kerri C at CK Farm said...

Well that's one movie off my go see list. Glad I went to go see the Prince of Persia instead...great movie btw!

Shannon Whitney Messenger said...

Well said you guys. Well said!

I haven't seen the movie or the show (I haven't had time for TV in a long time) but I know the feeling you're describing. I've felt it in other movies, and it's very discomfiting. Especially when they try to pass it off as comedy.

Such a shame.

Meredith said...

Definitely not an overreaction--the treatment of Abu Dhabi culture made me uncomfortable, too. No, I'm not a fan of the burqa, and I want to learn more about why women wear it, but Samantha's reactions to the culture were just so disrespectful.

Lisa_Gibson said...

I did go and see it. Samantha has always been the over the line, PC be damned type of character. In my opinion she was no different in this. Charlotte was dealing with the rigors of parenting, and lord which of us hasn't been there. Miranda (who was trying very hard to respect Middle Eastern culture) coping with a boss who finds little value in her, possibly because she's female. Carrie, well she's was caught in the headlights of marriage becoming mundane and are she and Big enough. I know that going to the movies is a time when you choose to suspend belief and relax for a couple of hours. If not, I would have found it unlikely that Carrie would run into Aidan in Abu-Dhabi. Just like I would find it surprising that Hogwarts can exist someplace where we mere muggles are unaware. I guess what I'm saying is I didn't take it all that seriously. I also (sadly) saw where they were leaving the storyline open to make #3, Carrie and Big decide on kids. NOT a good thing. I didn't love it, but didn't hate it either. Just my two cents.

Lisa Gail Green said...

Wow! I have to say I've never been a follower of Sex and the City though I've seen a few episodes. I'm shocked. I did hear it didn't do nearly as well as the first movie at the box office and now I think I know why. I doubt it will gain much popularity.

Donna Gambale said...

The movie definitely made me cringe as it progressed. But I've never been a Samantha fan, anyway, and not even a huge SATC fan. The highlight had to be Miranda and Charlotte's mom conversation.

Laura Marcella said...

I never got into the Sex and the City craze. My friend made me watch the first season on DVD, convinced I'd be hooked after that. I wasn't. And I saw the first movie and didn't like it. So I'll definitely skip the sequel. Thanks for the heads-up!

Natalie said...

I haven't seen it either, and I'm sure I won't. I really hope other cultures don't judge American's based on movies like that.

Tere Kirkland said...

Wow, and here I thought this movie was going to simply be vapid and all about the clothes, not ridiculing an entire culture.

I was never going to see it-I stopped watching the first one when Charlotte "Poughkeepsied" in her pants. Very high-brow humor there. But you've given me a very different opinion that makes me cringe.

Thanks for being so honest about the way the movie made you feel.

Myrna Foster said...

I haven't seen it (won't see it), but you're not over reacting. How many of our ancestors left their countries and came to America so they could worship in whatever manner they believed to be right? How can it possibly be okay to make fun of someone for the way they worship or believe, especially in their own country. That kind of humor is messed up.

Krispy said...

Thanks for this honest and thoughtful review. That sounds pretty awful. My sister and I were thinking about seeing it this weekend, but she's busy with finals. This will be something for us to ponder further when she comes back.

Lori W. said...

Excellent, thoughtful post. I don't think it's an overreaction but rather an interesting commentary. SATC in the Middle East sounds obnoxious.

Dara said...

Nope not taking it too seriously. I think that's why I never watched the show to begin with...That puts a bitter taste in my mouth.

And movies like that are exactly why terrorists come here. If that's all they see overseas, no wonder the world thinks we're so depraved.

Sarah said...

I saw the movie over the weekend and did not come away from it with the same distaste that you did. While the scene with Samantha and her date at dinner was certainly racy, most especially for the Middle East, Samantha was arrested for it. I thought the behavior was in line with Samantha’s unapologetic personality and not necessarily a personal affront to the culture. If anything, I think viewers would have sided with authorities and felt ashamed of the “too progressive” American behavior rather than see it as a critique of the United Arab Emirates. The scene of the woman eating the French fries was certainly interesting but don’t forget that she was also sitting beside a woman with a beautifully decorated, more modern outfit—the result of which I found to suggest that women in Abu Dhabi are embracing various styles of dress, some more conservative than others. I thought the scene in the marketplace where the women show their Louis Vuitton under their robes signified that despite all these cultural differences in attitude and dress, women across cultures like to take care of themselves, feel spoiled, and—based on how the scene played out—watch out for one another. There was certainly an undercurrent that U.S. culture is more embracing and open but I chose to see that not so much as a theme of the movie but, rather, a reflection of the characters’ points of view. We are talking about four women who see NYC as the center of the universe. In the first movie we saw Charlotte so afraid to drink water in Mexico that she couldn’t enjoy the culture. I think a parallel storyline played out here where Samantha was so entranced with hormone therapy and sex that she couldn’t appreciate everything around her but let’s not forget that Miranda worked hard to learn the language and see the sites and Carrie and Charlotte were constantly trying to cover Samantha up. While Samantha received a ton of scrutiny, we also saw a very hospitable culture where Carrie had her passport returned and the women, on the whole, were well taken care of.

Katelyn (twaddleoranything) said...

I haven't seen it yet (and likely won't until it's out on DVD), but I really appreciate your analysis. Interestingly, some reviews with similar opinions do come off as disproportionately outraged pontification, but I think your response is well-crafted and fair. Your connection to the woman in your doctor's office is particularly touching. Thanks for sharing!

Emily J. Griffin said...

You are NOT taking it too seriously. I was fully enjoying everythiing about it (with the understanding, as you said, that it's no Oscar contender) until the UGLY AMERICAN syndrome kicked in.

Forgetting for a moment the ridiculous lack of respect shown, let's simply talk about the film. Those of you who are writers-- SATC2 is a prime example of all plot, no character development. There were some really, really great set-ups for character growth:

Charlotte waiting so long for kids then having trouble adjusting to them and even begrudging them sometimes (so true and realistic and something that viewers could relate to -- her crying in the pantry, genius).

Miranda, a serious focused, job loving lawyer, feels unjustly persecuted (cure Abu Dabi connection) and chooses to leave her job. A missed opportunity for experiencing the struggles of being a stay-at-home mom (Miranda and Charlotte commiserating over drinks, genius) and coming to the conclusion that it's ok to love your job and find one that makes you happy.

Samantha, dealing with menopause and the societal pressure to stay young no matter what or be cast down the dark well of old age, never to return again.

Then, Carrie. Poor little Carrie. After finally landed her Big, she struggles with the real-life moments of being a married couple. Once the glamour wears off, what are you left with? How do you adjust? And what if your once-love shows up and makes you feel young and alive again? (I will say, thank goodness she and Aiden ONLY kissed. Anything more would've been too much.)

With all of that great, great stuff to work with WHY IN THE HELL did they need to go to Abu Dhabi? They certainly didn't draw any stunning cultural comparisons. In fact, they did the best they could to undo years and years of sensitivity training (so to speak) in America. It is interesting that Muslim women get to express themselves with fun fashions beneath there burkas. It could serve as such a great reminder to these characters to be THANKFUL for ALL that they have. Perhaps a multi-dimensional Muslim suuporting actress could have helped bring this point to life. Give a voice to a largely misunderstood culture (rather than a gaggle of giggling women in the back of a shop, laughing over designers and men - gag). Or just a shorter trip on the whole would've sufficed.

All in all, the trip to Abu Dhabi It was superfluous and ignorant on all accounts. Not only was it a bad film, it was a horrible representation of American women.

Medical Librarian said...

I, too, blogged about the movie before reading your post, and I had a reaction like yours. Very embarrassing and annoying.

I agree with other commenters that the scene with Miranda and Charlotte discussing motherhood is the best one in the movie. If only they had done more along those lines, it would have been like watching the t.v. series when it hit just the right notes. Sigh.

Talli Roland said...

I haven't seen it, although I was planning to. Now that I've read this, though, I'm not sure I will. My husband is Egyptain and some of my in-laws in Cairo wear burqas. I'm not saying I agree with their choice, but I would hate for them to see something like that and feel 'The West' was ridiculing them. They were the sweetest, most hosiptable women I have ever met.

Marsha Sigman said...

I will wait for it to come on cable. I'm very selective about which movies I will actually leave my house for.lol

I was never a big fan but the series was better than the first movie and I sort of expected the second one to be a flop.

Lindsay (a.k.a Isabella) said...

I haven't seen it yet but I was planning too. Having second thoughts now. Maybe I'll wait for the dvd. Hmmmm.

JennyMac said...

Oh boy...this is a tough one. I will say that Samanthas antics were very frowned upon by myself and everyone we were with. The reason I liked the movie is purely for the fun and fashion. I didnt like the first one because I felt my expectations mirrored the hype and I was very disappointed. I heard that the wardrobe was 10 mill for this movie and that is the sole purpose I went and why I enjoyed it. OH, and that Aidan returned. That being said, the disrespect to Abu Dhabi is why they werent allowed to film there. AND they had to have full time bodyguards the entire time filming in Morocco. I did love several scenes between the friends. Samantha seemed overly crass this film but I was certainly not disappointed in the clothing.

Jemi Fraser said...

I'm afraid I've only ever seen a few episodes of SATC. I find this so disappointing. I've heard the show is fun, silly, but forward thinking - sadly this sounds very much like backwards thinking to me. Too bad.

Elana Johnson said...

I haven't seen it, but I'm pretty much against ridiculing a person's beliefs, whether I agree with them or not. So nope, you're not taking it too seriously.

Susan Fields said...

I haven't seen the movie and haven't ever even seen an episode of the show...just doesn't really seem like my kind of thing. But from what you've described, I'd say that IFC.com commenter was right on target, which is really just sad.

Icy Roses said...

There were points in the movie that made me uncomfortable, because I felt like they were pushing the "dumb American" stereotype a little far. I don't know if it was blatantly trying to be disrespectful. The main thing was toward the end (and you know exactly where it started to go downhill) when the crew encounter the line between adventurous to straight-up WE AS SCRIPTWRITERS ARE MAKING SHIT UP AS WE GO, and accelerate past that line like no tomorrow.

Miranda was the least obnoxious character by far and the only one I didn't want to backhand and/or kick in the crotch by the end of the movie.

Slamdunk said...

I have no interest in the movie or the show, but your review is refreshingly honest--ridiculing cultures seems like a waste of great potential.

Erica Chapman said...

Wow. I didn't know that happened in the movie! I haven't seen it yet, was going to wait for it on DVD. Since I haven't seen it, I won't give my opinion on the movie.

But I believe (and always will) that we need to learn not to be so ethnocentric (Wha? where did that come from. Oh yeah High School Sociology) Shame the movie took us down a notch or three. Shame.

Kim said...

*fingers in ears* la la la la la la...
I can't hear you.

I'm going tomorrow night. Suburban mom-style. The previews look God-awful, but it's the event that's exciting. If nothing else, it'll be a night of good friends, no kids, drinks and popcorn. That's incentive enough.

Heidi Willis said...

I read this yesterday morning but didn't know how to respond. I thought about it all day, and then woke up thinking about it this morning.

I haven't seen the film, and admit I've only seen the SATC episodes in a cleaned up version on TBS, but the characters strike me as bold, and a bit edgy to begin with, and not ones that necessarily care that they're being culturally sensitive. I suppose in that way it doesn't surprise me they'd take the movie in that direction either.

The disturbing thing for me would have been assuming some of these women had the power to throw off their burqas and assert their womanly power. Oppression is real, and scary, and girls are dying for just showing the teensiest bit of skin. That's nothing to make light of.

Perhaps I should have written my own blog post! :) I don't know if I'll see the movie (probably not in the theatres anyway), but I'll think of you if I do!

Steph said...

I haven't seen it, while I loved the tv show, the first movie was so forced and just didn't do it for me. From what I have heard from most everyone is that this one was even worse...

What sticks with me from your post is this line...

"Ladies and gentlemen, this is why they hate us."

And that ensures that I will not see it... I've been feeling like that a lot lately when I see how a lot of people in our country have reacted to certain things, how we treat people, and as in this case, our movies... Ugh...

Gail said...

You may have done a real service by posting your strong feelings on the movie. Less than a dozen people out of the 56 comments at this moment, have actually gone to see the movie. If more people share feelings like this, it might hit the producers/writers/director in the pocketbook and send a message for more appropriate, respectful scripts. Yes, this was meant to be a "fluff" movie, however, that doesn't mean we have to ridicule other cultures.

I saw the movie but wish I hadn't. I thought the women being kicked out or paying for their excesses (hotel, food, etc) was the only appropriate part!
Going through menapause and hot flashes may make a woman a little grumpy, but doesn't mean that you're entitled to anything.

Talei said...

LOL - I just saw this last night with one of my BFF. We agreed a strategy pre show too ( I blogged it too :) But we went in with ' stratospheric expectation of fashion content; few expectations of plot.' I think it worked, BFF and I did alot of "OOHs and AHHs' at the gorgeous frocks and ensembles and whenever Big walked into a scene, but alas that was it. Have to say Samantha's lines were tasteless in places and did we need to hear about 'balls' every five minutes...? Not me. Still fun gossiping with BFF over a few capinrinhas.

Jessica said...

This post has been on my mind all week. I had plans to see this movie with friends tonight, but I ended up leaving after happy hour and skipping out on the movie. I just couldn't bring myself to give my money toward something like this. Honestly, your description of these scenes has left me sickened, and I haven't even seen the movie.

I may watch it one day when I'm not giving it my money. I went to Borders instead and bought The Iron King. I'd rather have my $10 support a YA author than Ugly Americans.

JESSJORDAN said...

I was going to see it. I was super excited about it, having absolutely adored the series and very-much-liked the first movie. I thought the same as you: I'm in for a raunchy good time, made all the better by experiencing the characters I've grown to love.

But then my sis sent me a text Saturday and said. "Movie was horrible. Jess, I borderline hated it." She called me to talk about it, and, while she didn't mention too much of the jab at Muslim culture, she basically said what I suspected: (1) no plot, (2) very little city and very little sex, (3) uncomfortable lameness, (4) bad clothes, and (5) slap in the face to the fans.

After that, I buckled and read some reviews, and I saw one similar to what you posted. And this just depresses the hell out of me.

I don't care if the movie is plotless. Throw these girls in the city, give them some drinks and let them ad lib it for all I care. But don't take the characters I've grown to love and turn them into people they've never been. I mean, I believed it when Charlotte wouldn't drink the water in Mexico, but this all sounds like overkill.

Not sure I'll be watching this one ... at least not for quite awhile.

(Sorry for the all-over-the-place ramble. Brain's not functioning this evening!)

Shame on you, SATC2 writers.